The 3 most underrated places to buy a home in the UK

...and why you should consider moving there.

Carlisle, Cumbria

Well-known for being the start point of Hadrian Wall’s, Carlisle is the northernmost city in England. According to research by Centre for Cities, 30% of 25-54 year olds cite property price as the main reason for living where they do. If this is your main concern, Carlisle could be for you. Hundreds of beautiful historic family townhouses are within a stone’s throw of the city centre, and a four bedroom house will set you back less than £200,000.

Carlisle boasts a Medieval castle with a calendar full of family-friendly events and a magnificent Cathedral. Its local bookstore, Bookshelf,  claims to be the biggest second-hand shop in the country. Whether or not this is true, it still has a magnificent collection of new and old books and a basement full of vinyls (East London - eat your heart out).

Spend your Saturday night at one of Carlisle’s many old pubs or trendy bars - at under £3 a pint you could do this every night...

Or at a classical concert in the Cathedral.

The true beauty of Carlisle is its location in the heart of the Lake District, with travel to Scotland clocking in at fifteen minutes. For dog walkers it’s impossible to run out of lakes, valleys and waterfalls to keep your canine entertained. If you’re looking for beautiful views for your upcoming wedding photos, Gretna Green is nearby.

The city is also only three hours from London on the West Coast Mainline.

And - of course - if you’re just looking to get away but have nowhere in particular in mind, the Carlisle – Settle railway meanders a picturesque route across the north of the country.

It’s also worth noting that the airport has just started doing commercial flights.

Grantham, Lincolnshire

With house prices in London through the roof, you can pay a lot of money for a property within commuting distance of the city or buy a four bedroom house in Grantham for £300,000 and always be just over an hour train ride from London. Grantham and the surrounding area are jeweled with historic buildings and sites.

St Wolfram’s Church and Grantham Manor are must-see local attractions, while a Saturday market features a food court and live music alongside traditional local market vendors. Belton House has the biggest park of any national trust property, and a soft play area indoors makes it a great place to visit with kids.

Grantham is surrounded by beautiful, flat countryside. Twenty percent of 35-54 year olds and 30% of people aged over 55 choose to live in their neighbourhood to be closer to the countryside.

Walking out of your front door will take you into the heart of the Lincolnshire landscape. Expect fields, farms and foot styles – traditional English countryside.

The Grantham Canal runs from Nottingham to Grantham via the Vale of Belvoir. It’s been closed to boats for years but has become a haven for wildlife including several species of rare bird. Five nearby RAF bases make this a go-to spot for military families. It’s also long been the home of local farming communities.

While the train to London from Grantham takes you about 70 minutes, you’re also 20 minutes from Peterborough and only a short drive from the A1.

Chepstow, Monmouthshire

Sitting just on the Welsh side of the Severn Bridge, Chepstow is a colourful town with its fair share of natural beauty, including the River Wye.

The downside of this is that to travel to nearby Bristol you have to pay £5.60 to cross the toll bridge. The upside is that the charge is about to be abolished, making Chepstow an attractive prospect for those working on the English side of the Severn.

The price of a four bedroom house is currently between three and five hundred thousand pounds, although this could go up as the transport links improve.

The centre of the town is made up of small, winding streets and Georgian houses. Plenty of independent shops make this a great place for a daytime coffee or stroll. If you fancy yourself a musician, then you’ll love Chepstow at night when the town is full of folk music and open mic nights.

If the nation’s oldest surviving stone castle isn’t enough of a draw, six miles outside of Chepstow is Tintern Abbey, a well preserved ruin dating back to the twelfth century. If you’re an explorer, the River Wye is full of adventures, and Offa’s Dyke offers fantastic walking opportunities.

If you’re one of the 25% of parents who move house to be in a better school catchment area then you’re in luck. A quarter of primary schools in Chepstow have a five star rating on SchoolGuide.co.uk

It’s not just Bristol that’s within commuting distance from Chepstow. You’re also half an hour’s drive from Cardiff and 20 minutes from Newport.

Hop on a train and you can be in London in two and a half hours.

If you’re thinking of moving, find out how Dashly can take the sting out of organising your mortgage by making sure you’re always getting the best deal.

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